Publication: Linked data, where do I recognise this from?

Uit Cultureel Erfgoed Standaardentoolbox
Ga naar: navigatie, zoeken


Samenvatting

This is a translation of the "Publicatie:Linked_data,_waar_ken_ik_dat_van?" page. Does it sound like a far-flung idea, nothing to do with you? Well, you’re probably actually already using applications that need linked data. If you look up what works by particular authors are available in your local library catalogue, you often also find information about the writers themselves. This is thanks to a link to the Virtual International Authority File (VIAF) database.


Referentie
Titel Linked data

where do I recognise this from? (Voorkeurstitel)

Locatie
Uitgever
Jaar van uitgave 2019
Rechten CC-BY-SA
Persistent ID


Linked data, where do I recognise this from?

Visualisation of the Linked Open Data Cloud on 29/03/2019

Does it sound like a far-flung idea, nothing to do with you? Well, you’re probably actually already using applications that need linked data. If you look up what works by particular authors are available in your local library catalogue, you often also find information about the writers themselves. This is thanks to a link to the Virtual International Authority File (VIAF) database.

Another cultural application that uses links to connect sources such as Wikidata, VIAF and the Union List of Artist Names, is the Photographers’ Identities Catalog. This interface was developed by The New York Public Library and provides access to a collection of biographical details for photographers, studios, manufacturers and other people involved in the production of photographic images.

The Flanders Heritage Agency (link in Dutch) publishes its thesauri – for dates, styles and cultures, materials, events, tree species, heritage values and decisions – as linked open data. The terms in the thesauri contain links to other terms in the thesauri, and sometimes also to other, international thesauri, such as the AAT and Historic England’s Monument Type Thesaurus. The Flemish government is also publishing its Central Reference Address Database (CRAB) as linked open data, and various cities are now offering datasets as linked data too, e.g. Ghent.

More online datasets? The Linked Open Data Cloud provides a global overview of all the online datasets that have been made available using linked open data, and which are sustainably linked together.


Is linked data always ‘open’?

If the linked data is made freely available, then we call it linked ‘open’ data Publication:_Open_data_and_free_use. The ‘opening up’ of digital cultural data isn’t always possible because it can still be subject to copyrights, and releasing it could affect people’s privacy or contravene contractual agreements. When publishing the News of the Great War newspapers as linked data, for example, only the newspapers’ metadata can be made available under an open licence. The OCR versions of the newspapers – i.e. the actual texts, which can still be subject to copyright – have been published as linked data which is subject to terms of use. You can read what ‘open’ means, and what requirements data needs to satisfy to be open, in Publication:_Open_data_and_free_use.